Help Offered – Range Contamination

Discussion in 'Volunteers' started by 300CALMAN, May 23, 2017.

  1. stug

    stug Well-Known Member

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    [video=youtube;WObkDKIVYSw]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WObkDKIVYSw&t=371s[/video]
     
  2. P38

    P38 Well-Known Member

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    Same here

    We drank the water collected from our roof for years

    The roof was painted with lead based paint and held in place with lead head nails.

    Cheers
    Pete
     
  3. WallyR

    WallyR Well-Known Member

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    Jeez - you guys crack me up :thumbsup:
     
  4. Gibo

    Gibo Sending it

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    Duh, that's why you guys are addicted to lead :D
     
  5. zimmer

    zimmer Well-Known Member

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    It is probably more a case of "what you don't know you don't know".

    One of the classic cases of lead poisoning was here Lead poisoning of Port Pirie children: a long history of looking the other way

    I served my time in a fertiliser works. The sulphuric acid making plant was all made of lead, huge quantities of lead sheeting, lead pipes, special pumps with lead impellors etc. (great for me as I was into BP shooting then). The guys that worked with the lead were called "lead burners" - was a recognized trade way back. They were regularly blood tested for lead absorption. I can remember on the odd occasions members of that department being stood down from working with lead due to getting excess reading in their blood tests. Stood down until subsequent blood tests showed level had dropped. And of course standards were pretty slack back then. Look how we used to treat asbestos.

    My smallbore club (long since folded) shot in a war memorial hall, thru under the stage. The mound was the highly polished hall floor. I used to see dusty powder out in front of the mound at the end of a night's shooting. I used to assume it was all burnt powder but have often wondered if there was any minute lead dust in it as well. And despite regular cleans our lead traps and the area were a mess with lots of dust everywhere. They backstops were angle plates which directed the lead into sand traps but the bullets striking the plates inevitably generated lead dust.

    And yes my current house roof although having no lead head nails has lead flashing, and we are on tank water.
     
  6. zimmer

    zimmer Well-Known Member

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    Visited Port Pirie in the 80s (tried not to breath whilst there), a depressing town.
     
  7. Angus_A

    Angus_A Cook

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    I remember back in my stoner days we used to go up to wrights hill fortress a lot and what used to be a burm at the very top field that was pretty contaminated. You could take a chunk of dirt out with your hand and come out with at least a few bullets.
    Incidentally and totally unrelated to this conversation, if you ever find yourself there, there's a crumbling bunker type thing right at the top with a weirdly well done painting of an SS officer giving a salute inside behind a bunch of overgrowth. Pretty bizarre.
     
    Last edited: May 24, 2017
  8. R93

    R93 Well-Known Member

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    I know it's US currency but the cheapest I can get primers are 4.5 cents each.

    Already behind.
    Still you can load 9 or 40 pretty cheap if shooting cast.

    Powder coating the projectiles is interesting?

    Sent from my SM-G935F using Tapatalk
     
  9. Angus_A

    Angus_A Cook

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    I've seen a few US reloaders doing it now, apparently saves the need for lube, but it's also pretty hotly debated so i don't know if it's true or not.
     
  10. 300CALMAN

    300CALMAN MIA somewhere in Nam

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    I have always wanted to give powder coating a go. Using something like this:

    https://www.harborfreight.com/10-30-psi-powder-coating-system-94244.html

    Coincidental it will probably slow down corrosion of the projectiles :D

    Weather you believe lead is toxic or not your local council is convinced so that is a problem. Anyway I have been involved in the investigation and clean up of a few and yes some of them probably have enough lead to mine.

    I am off to the range with my sieve.
     
  11. 300CALMAN

    300CALMAN MIA somewhere in Nam

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  12. Angus_A

    Angus_A Cook

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    Need a hand? Sounds like fun
     
  13. Boaraxa

    Boaraxa Well-Known Member

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    I no a section of river round these parts that takes a bit of a hammering , one day I was down looking for heavy yellow stuff instead I found pounds of lead couldn't believe it I spent a few days there quietly working away till day 5 it sounded like world war 3 & felt like it 2 , lead plopping all over the show I started dropping really loud F bombs until the shooting closest to me stopped, turns out it was a monthly gathering , shooting clays one of the traps they fire over the river :( can only imagine how much lead is on the downstream side.
     
  14. canross

    canross Well-Known Member

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    If the main issue is contaminated earth berms, then a dry washer is an easy way to separate out the lead. Basically it's a gold sluice that uses air instead of water. It generally works best with dry soil, but the benefit is that you don't need a huge water supply, and you don't have to worry about runoff. If you're concerned about dust you can enclose it and run water fogging nozzles around it so that any dust that comes out is caught before it drifts. Since berms need to be rebuild semi-regularly anyways, you run the dry washer during the rebuild and move your berm back and forth each time (Assuming a range with staggered raised berms for multiple distances).

    All the lead that is pulled out gets pre-dried and liquefied in a heavy walled trough to avoid vapor explosions - a large diameter steel pipe could be gas axed lengthwise for the trough - the heavy wall should transfer enough heat to the starting end to cook the water out of the lead before it gets hot enough to liquefy, then trickles into big pot with a bottom pour spigot to pour off the lead as it liquifies. The dross and stones/sand that get in are skimmed off or left floating - as long as you never run the pot all the way down you'll have a pretty decent lead alloy.

    I should ad - I've only ever seen the dry washer used for gold mining - never built one, but have spoken with people who have and they say they're easy to make - they're just less efficient than wet sluices. They are supposed to be better than recirculating sluices. I have bulk reclaimed lead from berms using screens then refining it out using heated troughs. It works great, especially when your trough is heavy walled and wide/long enough that you can really apply heat to it and put large quantities of lead/rock through it at a time.
     
    Last edited: May 30, 2017
  15. paulbrady

    paulbrady Well-Known Member

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    i was part of a crew that striped and replaced the backstops at the navy base at the end of the whangaparaoa peninsula ,we did the 300m, 100m range and also the pistol range ,this was about 10years ago , we must have got 2 1ton bags of lead gravel mix out of that before we could dump the rest of the material in the back stops
     
  16. Cordite

    Cordite Well-Known Member

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    Re the powder coating, why not? Looks cool, with the 9mm shells looking like my wife's lipstick. Ballistically, it's really not that different to paper patching, and might similarly get round barrel lead fouling - and then presumably also less lead dust thrown out with the muzzle gases.

    Studies done on kids growing up in 70's vs the 90's. The former measurably less intelligent than the latter, linked to lead inhalation from traffic smog generated from leaded petrol (I remembered the study as I'm in the former group, still made it through uni though). Bear in mind also that depleted uranium is bad news, not because of radiation but because it, like lead, is a heavy metal.

    Sensible upshot is, don't mess with lead, limit exposure -- but don't freak out either.
     
  17. 300CALMAN

    300CALMAN MIA somewhere in Nam

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    Yeah I remember being told about that. As long as the sediment is kept away from water courses soil back stops can be re-cycled. Adding a cover such as shredded rubber or geo-cloth helps also. The dust is also nasty.
     
  18. 300CALMAN

    300CALMAN MIA somewhere in Nam

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    I am definitely keen to try out powder coating. I remember pulling a few 9 mm powder coated projectiles out of a back stop and noticing how intact they were. Most start to corrode but not the coated ones. Myst help with leading surely?
     
  19. Cordite

    Cordite Well-Known Member

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    Must, since paper patching eliminates leading, and coppering (if there be such a word).
     

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