Introducing gun shot

Discussion in 'Hunting Dogs' started by bigbear, Jul 18, 2017.

  1. bigbear

    bigbear Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    230
    Likes Received:
    0
    Never really worried about it before with other dogs but want to get it right this time.
    I have starting of with the .22 and subs and then move onto hi velocity . Very happy with first introduction so far :)
    So my question is how often and how many shots.? also how long before moving up to a larger calibre rifle
     
  2. Bavarian_Hunter

    Bavarian_Hunter Animal Rights Activist

    Messages:
    1,552
    Likes Received:
    0
    You're over thinking it with how many and how often. You just need to do it until your dog is ready. If it's fine with smaller cals now I'd move to bigger ones. Maybe just sit the dog a little bit back from the gun for a start.

    I brought my gun dog up with guns and gun shots being associated with games or a treat which worked well.

    These days it takes everything to calm her down when she sees me pull the gun out!

    Sent from my SM-G930F using Tapatalk
     
  3. Ruff

    Ruff Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,197
    Likes Received:
    0
    You're doing it right! This is an exceprt I wrote for Rod and Rifle a while back and will be included in a book not far away from being published. Basically just confirms you are doing well.



    Introduction to gunfire is the number one way to create a gun shy dog. You will hear countless stories from people who said they simply took their dog out and fired the shotgun and it was fine and that was that! But doing the “Let’s see if it’s gunshy” approach can create a gunshy dog as well as a gun confident dog; you are “rolling the dice” and hope for a six. Beware of the One! Imagine yourself in a situation where you were not expecting a gunshot and someone discharges a shotgun literally right behind you back? Only the laundry would know the effect it had on you! It would startle you senseless and you have the power of reason to understand what did it, who did and how... the young pup in this scenario has no idea of shots and guns etc and simply because it is a gundog breed it does not have some genetic predisposition to gunfire.
    I start off right from the time the pup comes into my care. Like all conditioning starting off light and building up the levels of noise in increments is the safest and if done properly, 100% reliable method to accustom the dog to gunfire. I use stainless steel food and water bowls in my kennel and I deliberately throw them around on the concrete when cleaning or filling them etc. The thought of food and your complete indifference to the noise they make when clanging on the concrete creates a positive around this loud noise. At feeding time while the pup is consumed with its meal you can smack to pieces of 4X2 together to make a loud sharp noise. The beauty of using the wood blocks is you can customise the level of noise starting off quite gently and working up to equivalent of the .22 crack. This next step up to using, if you can, a .22 starter pistol and walking 50 meters or so, no closer, away from the kennels and firing a couple of shots as they eat. Any negative reaction from the dogs is met with simple indifference, your body language conveys all is well with the world, if there has been a negative reaction, however small, let the pup relax again, move further away and try again. Repeat this until the pup is comfortable and then slowly reverse the process so you get closer. Once the pup is comfortable with you firing it close by while it eats you are ready for the next stage. Get a mate to help. Get your pup out running around and even playing fetch or some distraction and have a mate fire, on your request when you know the pup is busy and distracted, a single shot from the shotgun or high powered rifle. If it reacts negatively just do as we did before and distract and move on. If it has no adverse reaction have your mate gets closer in 20 meter or so intervals. It might take a couple of sessions with the most nervous of pups but you should, in short time, have a dog not worried about gunfire and in time will look forward to it knowing it means a kill.

     
  4. bigbear

    bigbear Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    230
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks [MENTION=207]Ruff[/MENTION]. She loves her steel bowl. When she was younger i heard one hell of a racket she was chasing her bowl around the concrete:D Started with the timber clappers and my young fella is always outside banging stuff with his hammer making noise playing etc. I thought i will keep on working with the .22 over the next month and build up her confidence then move up to a larger calibre rifle. live rural so don't need to go far.
     
  5. Pointer

    Pointer Gold member

    Messages:
    3,739
    Likes Received:
    0
    I reckon shotguns are easier on the ears than the sharp crack of a centrefire rifle. If you cut the crimp off a shotgun shell and pour out the shot leaving the wad and powder in place they make a nice blank that is nowhere near as loud as a live round. Makes more of a 'puuff' than a boom.
     
  6. bigbear

    bigbear Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    230
    Likes Received:
    0
    I just thought i will be using her for indicating deer etc so will be mainly using a rifle over her so my thoughts were to get her used to rifle noise. I can get hold of f a 410?
     
  7. Pointer

    Pointer Gold member

    Messages:
    3,739
    Likes Received:
    0
    Yep I understand that but I think the centrefire should be the final destination. 22 to unsuppressed centrefire is a big jump
     
  8. bigbear

    bigbear Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    230
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks [MENTION=121]Pointer[/MENTION] any advise is greatly appreciated. (only use suppressed rifles)
     
  9. Ruff

    Ruff Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,197
    Likes Received:
    0
    Pointer, as usual, is making sense. I think as long as you take it incrementally you won't go wrong.
     
  10. Wirehunt

    Wirehunt Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,359
    Likes Received:
    0
    Ruff, if that's for a book fix the typo, two not to. "you can smack to pieces of 4X2 together" not having a go.

    I personally feel subgauge shotgun is way better to start with, the dogs tell me the same. .22 I have had way worse reactions with. But hey, each to their own. A couple of eight week old pups were happy enough with the 223 getting fired around them today, they had only had a few shots from the 20 gauge last week.
     
  11. bigbear

    bigbear Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    230
    Likes Received:
    0
    I've been using the 410 around her for the last couple off weeks and been very happy with results. Today i took the next step shooting my rifle with her. It doesn't seem to worry her one bit all that early work with the two bits off wood clapping' dropping the food bowl paying off:thumbsup:
     

Share This Page